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Iraq and Graffiti

Actually Graffiti and Iraq, really. We did one of our traditional door knocking sessions this morning. The most frequently raised issue was Graffiti, but Iraq was the second most frequently raised issue.

The feeling was generally positive which bodes well for the next local elections. Politicalbetting.com share my view that Labour cannot afford an early general election. The question, of course, is whether things get worse for them as we go down the track or not.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Do you have any plans to tackle the recent explosion in graffiti tagging in Yardley? Taking the Yew Tree area as an example, the rooftops seem to be a current trend- Lloyds TSB roof has a huge tag scrawled on it which visibly welcomes you to the area from half a mile down station road. The roofline above Woolworths, the post office, street furniture and private buildings alike are all plastered in tags, not making the area feel warm, safe, inviting. I noticed your Kings Heath/Moseley colleague Martin Mullaney in the local press attempting to tackle the issue.
John Hemming said…
Martin and I discuss this issue weekly. I have called for a meeting of all the parties concerned for 9th Feb. (Apart from the taggers, of course)

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