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My phone number is now a state secret (in Jersey)

The linked story is a bit odd. The Jersey police on returning Senator Stuart Syvret his mobile phone had erased my phone number.

It is all a bit weird. There will be an emergency meeting of the Jersey Parliament on Tuesday.

I wonder, however, what the police had to benefit from by deleting my phone number.

It is worth listening to the interview on the link about this.

Comments

Chelloise said…
Once again, the Jersey establishment has shot itself in the foot and drawn more suspicious press attention to the corruption, there..

The island's longest serving and most popular elected official is alternately derided as paranoid or arrested like a terrorist, for "Shafting Jersey in the eyes of the world."

Let's hope tampering with the good senator's phone and erasing your number will be the straw which breaks Big Brother's back, so Jersey may someday enjoy real participatory democracy.
Chelloise said…
Once again, Jersey establishment have cut off their noses to spite their faces by behaving like some third world dictatorship.

Senator Stuart Syvret is their most popular and longest serving elected official, but he is treated as an enemy bent on destroying the island whenever he speaks out about Jersey's lack of governmental transparency.

Do they not see the irony in alternately denigrating the good senator as "paranoid" about Jersey's misuse of political power, just before arresting him in a manner more suited to an armed terrorist?

Surly they know Senator Syvret's blog is only becoming so popular internationally because the public is intrigued by such ridiculous, and highly suspicious methods in their attempts to silence him.

Tampering with his telephone and then erasing your phone number will only further justify to the world what he writes on that "vile blog."

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